Get the free
prayloyolamed Prayer App
Apple   

Mt 1:1-17

An account of the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham. Abraham was the father of Isaac, and Isaac the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers, and Judah the father of Perez and Zerah by Tamar, and Perez the father of Hezron, and Hezron the father of Aram, and Aram the father of Aminadab, and Aminadab the father of Nahshon, and Nahshon the father of Salmon.

And Salmon the father of Boaz by Rahab, and Boaz the father of Obed by Ruth, and Obed the father of Jesse, and Jesse the father of King David. And David was the father of Solomon by the wife of Uriah, and Solomon the father of Rehoboam, and Rehoboam the father of Abijah, and Abijah the father of Asaph, and Asaph the father of Jehoshaphat, and Jehoshaphat the father of Joram, and Joram the father of Uzziah, and Uzziah the father of Jotham, and Jotham the father of Ahaz, and Ahaz the father of Hezekiah.

And Hezekiah the father of Manasseh, and Manasseh the father of Amos, and Amos the father of Josiah, and Josiah the father of Jechoniah and his brothers, at the time of the deportation to Babylon. And after the deportation to Babylon: Jechoniah was the father of Salathiel, and Salathiel the father of Zerubbabel, and Zerubbabel the father of Abiud, and Abiud the father of Eliakim, and Eliakim the father of Azor, and Azor the father of Zadok.

And Zadok the father of Achim, and Achim the father of Eliud, and Eliud the father of Eleazar, and Eleazar the father of Matthan, and Matthan the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom Jesus was born, who is called the Messiah. So all the generations from Abraham to David are fourteen generations; and from David to the deportation to Babylon, fourteen generations; and from the deportation to Babylon to the Messiah, fourteen generations.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Waiting for the Messiah

I read this Gospel passage and looked at the footnotes and found a long list of technicalities. Matthew did not include some people in this genealogy, the last verse is generation listing does not include fourteen generations but the summary at the end says that it does. It is easy to read this and think to yourself, “What is the meaning of this passage then?”

I believe the whole point of this Gospel passage is to demonstrate how long the wait for the Messiah truly was. I often explain to my students that in the Old Testament, the idea of an awaited Messiah does not explicitly appear in many of the earlier stories such as Abraham, Moses, and David. However, the longing for the Messiah is still present through the peoples’ innate longing to experience the perfection of God.   

Though the Messiah has come, humanity naturally continues to look forward to the meeting of the God whom our ancestors in faith sought. The Advent season is a time to recognize the natural desire to experience and know God and to respond actively through prayer and reflection.

—Beth Moeller is a member of the Billiken Teacher Corps through Saint Louis University and is the campus minister and theology teacher at Loyola Academy of Saint Louis, a middle school for boys.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Lord God, in this Advent season of preparation, we remember the many years that God’s people waited in the hope of the Messiah’s coming.  As we ready ourselves to celebrate the birth of that Messiah, open our hearts to seeking you through prayer and service to our neighbor. We ask this through Christ our Lord.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

##

Pray with the Pope

The Holy Father’s Monthly Prayer Intentions
Brought to you by Apostleship of Prayer the first Friday of each month.

##[[


Welcome to prayloyolamed.org!

At Loyola Medicine, “we also treat the human spirit. ®” Inspired by the vision of St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits and our namesake, we care for our patients as whole people - body, mind and spirit - and seek to be a healing presence in our communities. Whether you are a patient, family member, clinician, chaplain, or student, we invite you to pray these reflections and prayers with us.



    Connect
with us
   

loyolamedicine.org

Submit a Prayer Request

ARCHIVES

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
      1
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
2930     
       
    123
25262728   
       
  12345
6789101112
       
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
      1
       

DAILY INSPIRATION

December 17, 2018

Scripture

Mt 1:1-17

An account of the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham. Abraham was the father of Isaac, and Isaac the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers, and Judah the father of Perez and Zerah by Tamar, and Perez the father of Hezron, and Hezron the father of Aram, and Aram the father of Aminadab, and Aminadab the father of Nahshon, and Nahshon the father of Salmon.

And Salmon the father of Boaz by Rahab, and Boaz the father of Obed by Ruth, and Obed the father of Jesse, and Jesse the father of King David. And David was the father of Solomon by the wife of Uriah, and Solomon the father of Rehoboam, and Rehoboam the father of Abijah, and Abijah the father of Asaph, and Asaph the father of Jehoshaphat, and Jehoshaphat the father of Joram, and Joram the father of Uzziah, and Uzziah the father of Jotham, and Jotham the father of Ahaz, and Ahaz the father of Hezekiah.

And Hezekiah the father of Manasseh, and Manasseh the father of Amos, and Amos the father of Josiah, and Josiah the father of Jechoniah and his brothers, at the time of the deportation to Babylon. And after the deportation to Babylon: Jechoniah was the father of Salathiel, and Salathiel the father of Zerubbabel, and Zerubbabel the father of Abiud, and Abiud the father of Eliakim, and Eliakim the father of Azor, and Azor the father of Zadok.

And Zadok the father of Achim, and Achim the father of Eliud, and Eliud the father of Eleazar, and Eleazar the father of Matthan, and Matthan the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom Jesus was born, who is called the Messiah. So all the generations from Abraham to David are fourteen generations; and from David to the deportation to Babylon, fourteen generations; and from the deportation to Babylon to the Messiah, fourteen generations.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Ignatian Reflection

Waiting for the Messiah

I read this Gospel passage and looked at the footnotes and found a long list of technicalities. Matthew did not include some people in this genealogy, the last verse is generation listing does not include fourteen generations but the summary at the end says that it does. It is easy to read this and think to yourself, “What is the meaning of this passage then?”

I believe the whole point of this Gospel passage is to demonstrate how long the wait for the Messiah truly was. I often explain to my students that in the Old Testament, the idea of an awaited Messiah does not explicitly appear in many of the earlier stories such as Abraham, Moses, and David. However, the longing for the Messiah is still present through the peoples’ innate longing to experience the perfection of God.   

Though the Messiah has come, humanity naturally continues to look forward to the meeting of the God whom our ancestors in faith sought. The Advent season is a time to recognize the natural desire to experience and know God and to respond actively through prayer and reflection.

—Beth Moeller is a member of the Billiken Teacher Corps through Saint Louis University and is the campus minister and theology teacher at Loyola Academy of Saint Louis, a middle school for boys.

 

 


Prayer

Lord God, in this Advent season of preparation, we remember the many years that God’s people waited in the hope of the Messiah’s coming.  As we ready ourselves to celebrate the birth of that Messiah, open our hearts to seeking you through prayer and service to our neighbor. We ask this through Christ our Lord.  Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 

 

DAILY EXAMEN

The Daily Examen is a prayer technique developed by St. Ignatius to help us reflect on the events of the day to discern God’s presence and direction. When Ignatius founded the Society of Jesus, he required the Jesuits to practice the Examen twice daily—at noon and at the end of the day. It’s a habit that Jesuits, and many other Christians, practice to this day.

The Examen structure presented below is adapted from a technique described by Ignatius Loyola in his Spiritual Exercises. Click here for more information from our partners in ministry at Loyola Press.

Daily Examen

1. Become aware of God’s presence

God, I believe that at this moment I am in your presence and you are loving me.

2. Review the day with gratitude

God, you know my needs better than I know them. Give me your light and your help to see how you have been with me, both yesterday and today.

3. Pay attention to your emotions

God, help me to be grateful for the moments when people have affirmed me and challenged me. Help me to see how I have responded, and whether I have been kind to others and open to growth.

4. Choose one feature of the day and pray from it

God, forgive me for when I have not done my best or have failed to treat others well. Encourage me, guide me, and continue to bless me.

5. Look toward tomorrow

As I look to the remainder of this day, make me aware that you are with me. Show me how to be the person you want me to be.

THE POPE'S PRAYERS

Pray with the Pope

The Holy Father’s Monthly Prayer Intentions Brought to you by Apostleship of Prayer the first Friday of each month. [[

PRAYER REQUESTS

PRAYER CARDS


SUBSCRIBE TO EMAIL

Please complete the form below to subscribe to our daily email.




We respect your email privacy. You may unsubscribe from Daily Inspiration emails at any point.

ARCHIVES

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
      1
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
2930     
       
    123
25262728   
       
  12345
6789101112
       
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
      1