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October 18, 2014

St. Luke, apostle & evangelist

Luke 10: 1-9

After this the Lord appointed seventy others and sent them on ahead of him in pairs to every town and place where he himself intended to go. He said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore ask the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest. Go on your way. See, I am sending you out like lambs into the midst of wolves. Carry no purse, no bag, no sandals; and greet no one on the road.Whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace to this house!’ And if anyone is there who shares in peace, your peace will rest on that person; but if not, it will return to you.

Remain in the same house, eating and drinking whatever they provide, for the laborer deserves to be paid. Do not move about from house to house. Whenever you enter a town and its people welcome you, eat what is set before you; cure the sick who are there, and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Health and Healing

St. Luke the Evangelist came from the Hellenistic city of Antioch in Syria. He is believed to be both a physician and a disciple of St. Paul. Luke wrote the third gospel as well as the Acts of the Apostles. He has long been a special patron of those working in the medical and healing professions.

An emergency room event or hospital stay, even a visit to a medical office can bring worry and stress to both patient and family. The careful diagnosis and treatment provided by physicians and nurses, pastoral care chaplains and other medical professionals carry us through such events with confidence and grace. Today’s feast of St. Luke offers a reminder to bless God for the gift of good health. It also reminds us to pray for the talented and generous medical professionals who care for both body and spirit, patients and families, in times of need. Thanks to their good work, “the reign of God is at hand.”

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Good and gracious God, you share your ministry of healing with physicians and nurses, and with all those committed to healing patients and serving their families. Through the companionship of the great physician Luke, bless these professionals with discernment and wisdom for their healing of body and spirit.

Give us all patience when we are tired, fortitude when we feel weak, and the grace of hospitality for everyone we meet. All glory and praise to you, our loving and healing God, forever. Amen.

—Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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At Loyola Medicine, “we also treat the human spirit. ®” Inspired by the vision of St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits and our namesake, we care for our patients as whole people - body, mind and spirit - and seek to be a healing presence in our communities. Whether you are a patient, family member, clinician, chaplain, or student, we invite you to pray these reflections and prayers with us.



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October 18, 2014

St. Luke, apostle & evangelist

Luke 10: 1-9

After this the Lord appointed seventy others and sent them on ahead of him in pairs to every town and place where he himself intended to go. He said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore ask the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest. Go on your way. See, I am sending you out like lambs into the midst of wolves. Carry no purse, no bag, no sandals; and greet no one on the road.Whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace to this house!’ And if anyone is there who shares in peace, your peace will rest on that person; but if not, it will return to you.

Remain in the same house, eating and drinking whatever they provide, for the laborer deserves to be paid. Do not move about from house to house. Whenever you enter a town and its people welcome you, eat what is set before you; cure the sick who are there, and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translations

Health and Healing

St. Luke the Evangelist came from the Hellenistic city of Antioch in Syria. He is believed to be both a physician and a disciple of St. Paul. Luke wrote the third gospel as well as the Acts of the Apostles. He has long been a special patron of those working in the medical and healing professions.

An emergency room event or hospital stay, even a visit to a medical office can bring worry and stress to both patient and family. The careful diagnosis and treatment provided by physicians and nurses, pastoral care chaplains and other medical professionals carry us through such events with confidence and grace. Today’s feast of St. Luke offers a reminder to bless God for the gift of good health. It also reminds us to pray for the talented and generous medical professionals who care for both body and spirit, patients and families, in times of need. Thanks to their good work, “the reign of God is at hand.”

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

Good and gracious God, you share your ministry of healing with physicians and nurses, and with all those committed to healing patients and serving their families. Through the companionship of the great physician Luke, bless these professionals with discernment and wisdom for their healing of body and spirit.

Give us all patience when we are tired, fortitude when we feel weak, and the grace of hospitality for everyone we meet. All glory and praise to you, our loving and healing God, forever. Amen.

—Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago


Please share the Good Word with your friends!