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April 5, 2016

St. Vincent Ferrer

Acts 4: 32-37

Now the whole group of those who believed were of one heart and soul, and no one claimed private ownership of any possessions, but everything they owned was held in common. With great power the apostles gave their testimony to the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, and great grace was upon them all. There was not a needy person among them, for as many as owned lands or houses sold them and brought the proceeds of what was sold.

They laid it at the apostles’ feet, and it was distributed to each as any had need. There was a Levite, a native of Cyprus, Joseph, to whom the apostles gave the name Barnabas (which means “son of encouragement”). He sold a field that belonged to him, then brought the money, and laid it at the apostles’ feet.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Sharing My Resources

The first apostles had everything in common and in this way they lived as witnesses to Christ, caring for those around them. There are many ways to live as a witness to Christ, and today’s first reading invites us to consider how well we are doing. We are in the second week of Easter, and “alleluia is our song,” but how does that manifest itself to those around us? Are you a prayerful person? Are you in tune to the needs of those around you?

You may not have the resources to distribute to those around you as the apostles did, but are you even aware of the needs? Is money the only way to help? What about your time and attention? Where are these spent? Whatever the answer, does that leave you looking out the window to a world in need, or reflecting only on your own needs?

—Patrick Hyland, S.J., a Jesuit scholastic of the Chicago-Detroit province, is studying philosophy at St. Louis University. He lives at the Bellarmine House of Studies.

Prayer

How do you, Lord, look at me?
What do you feel in your heart for me?

—John Eagan, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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At Loyola Medicine, “we also treat the human spirit. ®” Inspired by the vision of St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits and our namesake, we care for our patients as whole people - body, mind and spirit - and seek to be a healing presence in our communities. Whether you are a patient, family member, clinician, chaplain, or student, we invite you to pray these reflections and prayers with us.



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April 5, 2016

St. Vincent Ferrer

Acts 4: 32-37

Now the whole group of those who believed were of one heart and soul, and no one claimed private ownership of any possessions, but everything they owned was held in common. With great power the apostles gave their testimony to the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, and great grace was upon them all. There was not a needy person among them, for as many as owned lands or houses sold them and brought the proceeds of what was sold.

They laid it at the apostles’ feet, and it was distributed to each as any had need. There was a Levite, a native of Cyprus, Joseph, to whom the apostles gave the name Barnabas (which means “son of encouragement”). He sold a field that belonged to him, then brought the money, and laid it at the apostles’ feet.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Sharing My Resources

The first apostles had everything in common and in this way they lived as witnesses to Christ, caring for those around them. There are many ways to live as a witness to Christ, and today’s first reading invites us to consider how well we are doing. We are in the second week of Easter, and “alleluia is our song,” but how does that manifest itself to those around us? Are you a prayerful person? Are you in tune to the needs of those around you?

You may not have the resources to distribute to those around you as the apostles did, but are you even aware of the needs? Is money the only way to help? What about your time and attention? Where are these spent? Whatever the answer, does that leave you looking out the window to a world in need, or reflecting only on your own needs?

—Patrick Hyland, S.J., a Jesuit scholastic of the Chicago-Detroit province, is studying philosophy at St. Louis University. He lives at the Bellarmine House of Studies.

Prayer

How do you, Lord, look at me?
What do you feel in your heart for me?

—John Eagan, S.J.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!