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October 21, 2016

Eph 4: 1-6

I therefore, the prisoner in the Lord, beg you to lead a life worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love, making every effort to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to the one hope of your calling, one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of all, who is above all and through all and in all.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

God Is Here

C.S. Lewis once said, “There are no ordinary people…Next to the Blessed Sacrament itself, your neighbor is the holiest object present to your senses.”

It is easy to see how God is “in” our close loved ones. But for me, this is much harder to see in people I disagree with, or who hurt others. When I see so much negativity and hate in what is happening around me, it is often easier, or more popular, to go along with others and just criticize. I forget that fighting for what is just and good means also constantly seeking reconciliation, community, and love—even with enemies.

So let us honestly ask ourselves if there is anyone in whom it is difficult to recognize God’s presence. And if there is, listen to Jesus in prayer to understand how to love them as he does, whether friend or enemy.

—Chris Williams, S.J., a Jesuit scholastic of the Wisconsin province, is studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

 “…our charity must be a real and costly love, with deep feeling for the sins in spite of which we love the sinner – no mere tolerance, or indulgence which parodies love as flippancy parodies merriment. Next to the Blessed Sacrament itself, your neighbor is the holiest object presented to your senses.”

—C.S. Lewis in The Weight of Glory

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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At Loyola Medicine, “we also treat the human spirit. ®” Inspired by the vision of St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits and our namesake, we care for our patients as whole people - body, mind and spirit - and seek to be a healing presence in our communities. Whether you are a patient, family member, clinician, chaplain, or student, we invite you to pray these reflections and prayers with us.



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October 21, 2016

Eph 4: 1-6

I therefore, the prisoner in the Lord, beg you to lead a life worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love, making every effort to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to the one hope of your calling, one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of all, who is above all and through all and in all.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

God Is Here

C.S. Lewis once said, “There are no ordinary people…Next to the Blessed Sacrament itself, your neighbor is the holiest object present to your senses.”

It is easy to see how God is “in” our close loved ones. But for me, this is much harder to see in people I disagree with, or who hurt others. When I see so much negativity and hate in what is happening around me, it is often easier, or more popular, to go along with others and just criticize. I forget that fighting for what is just and good means also constantly seeking reconciliation, community, and love—even with enemies.

So let us honestly ask ourselves if there is anyone in whom it is difficult to recognize God’s presence. And if there is, listen to Jesus in prayer to understand how to love them as he does, whether friend or enemy.

—Chris Williams, S.J., a Jesuit scholastic of the Wisconsin province, is studying philosophy at Loyola University Chicago.

Prayer

 “…our charity must be a real and costly love, with deep feeling for the sins in spite of which we love the sinner – no mere tolerance, or indulgence which parodies love as flippancy parodies merriment. Next to the Blessed Sacrament itself, your neighbor is the holiest object presented to your senses.”

—C.S. Lewis in The Weight of Glory

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!