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October 22, 2018

Lk 12: 13-21

Someone in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, tell my brother to divide the family inheritance with me.” But he said to him, “Friend, who set me to be a judge or arbitrator over you?” And he said to them, “Take care! Be on your guard against all kinds of greed; for one’s life does not consist in the abundance of possessions.”

Then he told them a parable: “The land of a rich man produced abundantly. And he thought to himself, ‘What should I do, for I have no place to store my crops?’ Then he said, ‘I will do this: I will pull down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, ‘Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’

But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Rich in what matters to God

Our time, money, and resources can often feel limited.  Sometimes, I find myself wishing for more: more time to get a little extra sleep or finish that project, more money to take that flight to a wedding across the country, or maybe more space to accommodate out-of-town guests.  While these are not selfish or even unreasonable wishes, we still find ourselves in a place where it becomes hard to accept those realities. To truly be rich in what matters to God, we can practice sacrifice of the things we do have.  Can I spare a few minutes before driving home to check in with a coworker? Can I drop my change in the tip jar after buying lunch? By continuing to give of what we have, even if it doesn’t seem like much, we bring ourselves closer to the true mission of Christ and closer in kinship to those around us.

—Erin Emeric is a music teacher at Christ, Light of the Nations school and a member of the Billiken Teaching Corps at Saint Louis University.

Prayer

Lord, help us to focus on all that we have instead of what we don’t have.  May we recognize the needs of others and do what we can to meet them. Let us see those things that matter to you, and strive for more of that in our daily life.  May we store up treasure in heaven rather than on earth. Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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October 22, 2018

Lk 12: 13-21

Someone in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, tell my brother to divide the family inheritance with me.” But he said to him, “Friend, who set me to be a judge or arbitrator over you?” And he said to them, “Take care! Be on your guard against all kinds of greed; for one’s life does not consist in the abundance of possessions.”

Then he told them a parable: “The land of a rich man produced abundantly. And he thought to himself, ‘What should I do, for I have no place to store my crops?’ Then he said, ‘I will do this: I will pull down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, ‘Soul, you have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.’

But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your life is being demanded of you. And the things you have prepared, whose will they be?’ So it is with those who store up treasures for themselves but are not rich toward God.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Rich in what matters to God

Our time, money, and resources can often feel limited.  Sometimes, I find myself wishing for more: more time to get a little extra sleep or finish that project, more money to take that flight to a wedding across the country, or maybe more space to accommodate out-of-town guests.  While these are not selfish or even unreasonable wishes, we still find ourselves in a place where it becomes hard to accept those realities. To truly be rich in what matters to God, we can practice sacrifice of the things we do have.  Can I spare a few minutes before driving home to check in with a coworker? Can I drop my change in the tip jar after buying lunch? By continuing to give of what we have, even if it doesn’t seem like much, we bring ourselves closer to the true mission of Christ and closer in kinship to those around us.

—Erin Emeric is a music teacher at Christ, Light of the Nations school and a member of the Billiken Teaching Corps at Saint Louis University.

Prayer

Lord, help us to focus on all that we have instead of what we don’t have.  May we recognize the needs of others and do what we can to meet them. Let us see those things that matter to you, and strive for more of that in our daily life.  May we store up treasure in heaven rather than on earth. Amen.

—The Jesuit Prayer team

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!