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February 26, 2019

Mk 9: 30-37

They went on from there and passed through Galilee. He did not want anyone to know it; for he was teaching his disciples, saying to them, “The Son of Man is to be betrayed into human hands, and they will kill him, and three days after being killed, he will rise again.” But they did not understand what he was saying and were afraid to ask him.

Then they came to Capernaum; and when he was in the house he asked them, “What were you arguing about on the way?” But they were silent, for on the way they had argued with one another who was the greatest. He sat down, called the twelve, and said to them, “Whoever wants to be first must be last of all and servant of all.” Then he took a little child and put it among them; and taking it in his arms, he said to them, “Whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes not me but the one who sent me.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

What does it mean to fear the Lord?

The apostles “were afraid to question him.” Why? Why should the apostles be afraid of Jesus? And, is that supposed to be a good thing? Maybe.

There is a great quote from the ’90s movie First Night that can help us understand. King Arthur tells Lancelot, “A person who fears nothing is a person who loves nothing.” Basically, if you truly love someone, you will fear not being with them, disappointing them or losing them. That is the one good type of fear. It is a fear that drives us to be in union with, to serve, and to do right by the ones we love.

This is what we mean by “fear of the Lord.” We do not want to disappoint our Lord. If we love him, we do not want to do anything to be separated from him. And that is a good thing.

What or whom do I fear losing? Is that fear based on love? Do I fear disappointing or being separated from our Lord?

—Stephen Kramer, SJ, is a Jesuit deacon of the Central and Southern Province currently finishing his Master’s degree in Theology at the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry.

Prayer

Lord Jesus Christ,
whom I love with all of my heart,
help me to never be afraid,
except to fear not loving you as I should.

—Steven Kramer, SJ

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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February 26, 2019

Mk 9: 30-37

They went on from there and passed through Galilee. He did not want anyone to know it; for he was teaching his disciples, saying to them, “The Son of Man is to be betrayed into human hands, and they will kill him, and three days after being killed, he will rise again.” But they did not understand what he was saying and were afraid to ask him.

Then they came to Capernaum; and when he was in the house he asked them, “What were you arguing about on the way?” But they were silent, for on the way they had argued with one another who was the greatest. He sat down, called the twelve, and said to them, “Whoever wants to be first must be last of all and servant of all.” Then he took a little child and put it among them; and taking it in his arms, he said to them, “Whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes not me but the one who sent me.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

What does it mean to fear the Lord?

The apostles “were afraid to question him.” Why? Why should the apostles be afraid of Jesus? And, is that supposed to be a good thing? Maybe.

There is a great quote from the ’90s movie First Night that can help us understand. King Arthur tells Lancelot, “A person who fears nothing is a person who loves nothing.” Basically, if you truly love someone, you will fear not being with them, disappointing them or losing them. That is the one good type of fear. It is a fear that drives us to be in union with, to serve, and to do right by the ones we love.

This is what we mean by “fear of the Lord.” We do not want to disappoint our Lord. If we love him, we do not want to do anything to be separated from him. And that is a good thing.

What or whom do I fear losing? Is that fear based on love? Do I fear disappointing or being separated from our Lord?

—Stephen Kramer, SJ, is a Jesuit deacon of the Central and Southern Province currently finishing his Master’s degree in Theology at the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry.

Prayer

Lord Jesus Christ,
whom I love with all of my heart,
help me to never be afraid,
except to fear not loving you as I should.

—Steven Kramer, SJ

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!