Get the free
prayloyolamed Prayer App
Apple   

May 31, 2019

Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Lk 1: 39-56

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.”

And Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name. His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation.

He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.”

And Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Bold Humility

I remind myself that Mary’s willingness to bear a child was not passive. Hers was an active ‘yes,’ and the meekness with which she is often characterized is, at its heart, a bold humility.

By how she sings her Song of Praise, the Magnificat, I know that she is audacious in her actions and her words. Mary is firmly rooted, an echo of the origins of the word humble—humus, Latin for ‘ground.’

She is like Mary Karr’s “great stallion at full gallop,” deft, sensitive and strong as hell.

—Claire Peterson works in the advancement and communications office of the USA Central and Southern Province and is the local organizer for Jesuit Connections – St. Louis.

Prayer

Who The Meek Are Not

         Not the bristle-bearded Igors bent
under burlap sacks, not peasants knee-deep
         in the rice-paddy muck,
nor the serfs whose quarter-moon sickles
         make the wheat fall in waves
they don’t get to eat. My friend the Franciscan
         nun says we misread
that word meek in the Bible verse that blesses them.
         To understand the meek
(she says) picture a great stallion at full gallop
         in a meadow, who—
at his master’s voice—seizes up to a stunned
         but instant halt.
So with the strain of holding that great power
         in check, the muscles
along the arched neck keep eddying,
         and only the velvet ears
prick forward, awaiting the next order.

—Mary Karr, published in Sinners Welcome


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Welcome to prayloyolamed.org!

At Loyola Medicine, “we also treat the human spirit. ®” Inspired by the vision of St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits and our namesake, we care for our patients as whole people - body, mind and spirit - and seek to be a healing presence in our communities. Whether you are a patient, family member, clinician, chaplain, or student, we invite you to pray these reflections and prayers with us.



    Connect
with us
   

loyolamedicine.org

Submit a Prayer Request

ARCHIVES

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  12345
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
       
     12
       
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
2930     
       
    123
25262728   
       
  12345
6789101112
       
   1234
262728    
       
       
       
      1
       

May 31, 2019

Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Lk 1: 39-56

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.”

And Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name. His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation.

He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.”

And Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Bold Humility

I remind myself that Mary’s willingness to bear a child was not passive. Hers was an active ‘yes,’ and the meekness with which she is often characterized is, at its heart, a bold humility.

By how she sings her Song of Praise, the Magnificat, I know that she is audacious in her actions and her words. Mary is firmly rooted, an echo of the origins of the word humble—humus, Latin for ‘ground.’

She is like Mary Karr’s “great stallion at full gallop,” deft, sensitive and strong as hell.

—Claire Peterson works in the advancement and communications office of the USA Central and Southern Province and is the local organizer for Jesuit Connections – St. Louis.

Prayer

Who The Meek Are Not

         Not the bristle-bearded Igors bent
under burlap sacks, not peasants knee-deep
         in the rice-paddy muck,
nor the serfs whose quarter-moon sickles
         make the wheat fall in waves
they don’t get to eat. My friend the Franciscan
         nun says we misread
that word meek in the Bible verse that blesses them.
         To understand the meek
(she says) picture a great stallion at full gallop
         in a meadow, who—
at his master’s voice—seizes up to a stunned
         but instant halt.
So with the strain of holding that great power
         in check, the muscles
along the arched neck keep eddying,
         and only the velvet ears
prick forward, awaiting the next order.

—Mary Karr, published in Sinners Welcome


Please share the Good Word with your friends!