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September 13, 2019

St. John Chrysostom

Lk 6: 39-42

He also told them a parable: “Can a blind person guide a blind person? Will not both fall into a pit? A disciple is not above the teacher, but everyone who is fully qualified will be like the teacher. Why do you see the speck in your neighbor’s eye, but do not notice the log in your own eye? Or how can you say to your neighbor, ‘Friend, let me take out the speck in your eye,’ when you yourself do not see the log in your own eye? 

You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your neighbor’s eye.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Noticing the flaws around us

Today’s Gospel is one that seems to come up regularly when I’m talking with my children.  They are quick to point out when a sibling has snuck a piece of candy, or snatched a toy away, or said something hurtful, while seeming to forget that they engaged in these same behaviors sometimes minutes earlier. I need to remind them that each of us–adults included–makes mistakes and we need to focus on our own behavior rather than someone else’s.  In my own life, though, this is something I know intellectually, but can still struggle to put into practice. How easy it is to point out the flaws of relatives, coworkers, or even public figures we have never personally met.

Jesus knows that none of us are without flaws, and offers us this reminder to look at our own blind spots before starting in on others.  What are the errors that I am quick to point out in others? When these come to mind, how can I instead turn inward and take the opportunity to change my own behavior?

—Lauren Gaffey is the Associate Director of Communications for the Midwest Jesuits and the Program Director of Charis Ministries and Jesuit Connections.

Prayer

Good and gracious God, you look upon us with a compassionate gaze, not despising us for our shortcomings.  Help us to take this same view of others, while at the same time looking within ourselves to strive to overcome our failings.  May we never be so blinded by a log in our eye that we are unable to grow in friendship with you. Amen.

—Lauren Gaffey


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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September 13, 2019

St. John Chrysostom

Lk 6: 39-42

He also told them a parable: “Can a blind person guide a blind person? Will not both fall into a pit? A disciple is not above the teacher, but everyone who is fully qualified will be like the teacher. Why do you see the speck in your neighbor’s eye, but do not notice the log in your own eye? Or how can you say to your neighbor, ‘Friend, let me take out the speck in your eye,’ when you yourself do not see the log in your own eye? 

You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your neighbor’s eye.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Noticing the flaws around us

Today’s Gospel is one that seems to come up regularly when I’m talking with my children.  They are quick to point out when a sibling has snuck a piece of candy, or snatched a toy away, or said something hurtful, while seeming to forget that they engaged in these same behaviors sometimes minutes earlier. I need to remind them that each of us–adults included–makes mistakes and we need to focus on our own behavior rather than someone else’s.  In my own life, though, this is something I know intellectually, but can still struggle to put into practice. How easy it is to point out the flaws of relatives, coworkers, or even public figures we have never personally met.

Jesus knows that none of us are without flaws, and offers us this reminder to look at our own blind spots before starting in on others.  What are the errors that I am quick to point out in others? When these come to mind, how can I instead turn inward and take the opportunity to change my own behavior?

—Lauren Gaffey is the Associate Director of Communications for the Midwest Jesuits and the Program Director of Charis Ministries and Jesuit Connections.

Prayer

Good and gracious God, you look upon us with a compassionate gaze, not despising us for our shortcomings.  Help us to take this same view of others, while at the same time looking within ourselves to strive to overcome our failings.  May we never be so blinded by a log in our eye that we are unable to grow in friendship with you. Amen.

—Lauren Gaffey


Please share the Good Word with your friends!