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October 29, 2019

Lk 13: 18-21

He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what should I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in the garden; it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.” And again he said, “To what should I compare the kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Christ brings us gradual growth

One thing this parable teaches us is that Christ, as King and Lord, is the one who brings the growth of the Kingdom within our hearts. Christ brings about the gradual growth of the Kingdom within our hearts as we seek to know his will and carry it out. Moreover, he brings about this growth in a hidden manner. This hidden growth is illustrated in the parable of the mustard seed. The tree starts out as a tiny mustard seed and becomes a great tree. We don’t see the gradual steps of the growth, but eventually we may realize that there is a noticeable change in size. Christ brings about this hidden growth within us in a special way through prayer and the sacramental life of the Church. This growth is especially brought about within us when we bear our hearts to Christ in the sacrament of Confession and at the Mass.

Alex Coffey, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the U.S. Central and Southern Province studying philosophy at Saint Louis University.

Prayer

Grace of Communion (a prayer to be used at Mass)

Thou come to me at holy Mass. Let me at Holy Communion approach Thee with awe and love in whom resides all perfection and from whom I am allowed to gain it. Let me come to the Sanctifier to be sanctified. Let me come to Thee to learn my duty and to receive grace to do it. At other times of the day I am reminded of watching, toiling, struggling, and suffering; but, at this moment I am reminded of Thy gifts towards me a sinner.

I am reminded that I can do nothing, and that Thou do everything. This is especially the moment of grace. I come to see and experience Thy mercies. I come before Thee as the helpless beings during Thy ministry, who were brought on beds and couches for a cure. I come to be made whole.

May each Holy Communion, as it comes, find me more and more like Thee (who at these times becomes a little child for my sake)—more simple-minded, more humble, more holy, more affectionate, more resigned, more happy, more full of Thee. Amen.

—St. John Henry Newman


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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October 29, 2019

Lk 13: 18-21

He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what should I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in the garden; it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.” And again he said, “To what should I compare the kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Christ brings us gradual growth

One thing this parable teaches us is that Christ, as King and Lord, is the one who brings the growth of the Kingdom within our hearts. Christ brings about the gradual growth of the Kingdom within our hearts as we seek to know his will and carry it out. Moreover, he brings about this growth in a hidden manner. This hidden growth is illustrated in the parable of the mustard seed. The tree starts out as a tiny mustard seed and becomes a great tree. We don’t see the gradual steps of the growth, but eventually we may realize that there is a noticeable change in size. Christ brings about this hidden growth within us in a special way through prayer and the sacramental life of the Church. This growth is especially brought about within us when we bear our hearts to Christ in the sacrament of Confession and at the Mass.

Alex Coffey, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the U.S. Central and Southern Province studying philosophy at Saint Louis University.

Prayer

Grace of Communion (a prayer to be used at Mass)

Thou come to me at holy Mass. Let me at Holy Communion approach Thee with awe and love in whom resides all perfection and from whom I am allowed to gain it. Let me come to the Sanctifier to be sanctified. Let me come to Thee to learn my duty and to receive grace to do it. At other times of the day I am reminded of watching, toiling, struggling, and suffering; but, at this moment I am reminded of Thy gifts towards me a sinner.

I am reminded that I can do nothing, and that Thou do everything. This is especially the moment of grace. I come to see and experience Thy mercies. I come before Thee as the helpless beings during Thy ministry, who were brought on beds and couches for a cure. I come to be made whole.

May each Holy Communion, as it comes, find me more and more like Thee (who at these times becomes a little child for my sake)—more simple-minded, more humble, more holy, more affectionate, more resigned, more happy, more full of Thee. Amen.

—St. John Henry Newman


Please share the Good Word with your friends!